The Right To Bear Arms

A few quotations from our founding fathers and others to uplift your spirit in this fight for freedom re: the right to bear arms.       jim

 

“For a people who are free, and who mean to remain so, a well organized and armed militia is their best security.”   THOMAS JEFFERSON

 “Laws that forbid the carrying of arms… disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes… Such laws make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants; they serve rather to encourage than to prevent homicides, for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man.”   THOMAS  JEFFERSON

 

“No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms. The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government”

— Thomas Jefferson, 1 Thomas Jefferson Papers, 334

 

“The very atmosphere of firearms anywhere and everywhere restrains evil interference – they deserve a place of honor with all that’s good”  — George Washington

 “I hold it, that a little rebellion, now and then, is a good thing, and as necessary in the political world as storms in the physical.”

— Thomas Jefferson, Letter to James Madison, January 30, 1787

 

“Today, we need a nation of Minutemen, citizens who are not only prepared to take arms, but citizens who regard the preservation of freedom as the basic purpose of their daily life and who are willing to consciously work and sacrifice for that freedom.”—– John F. Kennedy

 

The right of the citizens to keep and bear arms has justly been considered as the palladium of the liberties of a republic; since it offers a strong moral check against usurpation and arbitrary power of rulers; and will generally, even if these are successful in the first instance, enable the people to resist and triumph over them.”

— Supreme Court Justice Joseph Story of the John Marshall Court 

“Guard with jealous attention the public liberty. Suspect every one who approaches that jewel. Unfortunately, nothing will preserve it but downright force. Whenever you give up that force, you are inevitably ruined.”

— Patrick Henry, speech of June 5 1788

 

Are we at last brought to such a humiliating and debasing degradation, that we cannot be trusted with arms for our own defence? Where is the difference between having our arms in our own possession and under our own direction, and having them under the management of Congress? If our defence be the *real* object of having those arms, in whose hands can they be trusted with more propriety, or equal safety to us, as in our own hands?

— Patrick Henry, speech of June 9 1788

“To disarm the people… was the best and most effectual way to enslave them.”

— George Mason, speech of June 14, 1788

 

“Government is not reason, it is not eloquence, it is force; like fire, a troublesome servant and a fearful master. Never for a moment should it be left to irresponsible action.”

— George Washington, in a speech of January 7, 1790

 

“A militia, when properly formed, are in fact the people themselves … and include all men capable of bearing arms.”

— Senator Richard Henry Lee, 1788, on “militia” in the 2nd Amendment

 That the said Constitution shall never be construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United states who are peaceable citizens from keeping their own arms…— Samuel Adams, in “Phila. Independent Gazetteer”, August 20, 1789

The danger (where there is any) from armed citizens, is only to the *government*, not to *society*; and as long as they have nothing to revenge in the government (which they cannot have while it is in their own hands) there are many advantages in their being accustomed to the use of arms, and no possible disadvantage.

— Joel Barlow, “Advice to the Privileged Orders”, 1792-93

[The disarming of citizens] has a double effect, it palsies the hand and brutalizes the mind: a habitual disuse of physical forces totally destroys the moral [force]; and men lose at once the power of protecting themselves, and of discerning the cause of their oppression.

— Joel Barlow, “Advice to the Privileged Orders”, 1792-93

 

 I ask, sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people, except for a few public officials.————-George Mason, 3 Elliott, Debates at 425-426

 

It is because the people are civilized, that they are with safety armed.—Joel Barlow

 

Let therefore every man, that, appealing to his own heart, feels the least spark of virtue or freedom there, think that it is an honor which he owes himself, and a duty which he owes his country, to bear arms.—–Thomas Pownall

 

The price of liberty is, always has been, and always will be blood: The person who is not willing to die for his liberty has already lost it to the first scoundrel who is willing to risk dying to violate that person’s liberty! Are you free?— Andrew Ford

 

Without either the first or second amendment, we would have no liberty; the first allows us to find out what’s happening, the second allows us to do something about it! The second will be taken away first, followed by the first and then the rest of our freedoms.——– Andrew Ford

 

Before a standing army can rule, the people must be disarmed; as they are in almost every kingdom of Europe. The supreme power in America cannot enforce unjust laws by the sword; because the whole body of people are armed, and constitute a force superior to any body of regular troops that can be, on any pretense, raised in the United States.——– Noah Webster, An Examination into the Leading Principals of the Federal Constitution, 1787

 

The tree of liberty must be watered periodically with the blood of tyrants and patriots alike. It is its natural manure.——— Thomas Jefferson

 

Gun Control: The assumption that everyone is a potential criminal.

 

The right to buy weapons is the right to be free.——- van Gogt

 

If cowardly and dishonorable men sometimes shoot unarmed men with army pistols or guns, the evil must be prevented by the penitentiary and gallows, and not by a general deprivation of constitutional privilege.—Arkansas Supreme Court, Wilson v. State (1878)

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